There are two varieties of smoke alarm. One of ’em ain’t so good.

Which one is better? Now that’s a searing question.
In addition, do not start ripping apart smoke alarms and playing with the americium. It is mostly harmless when outdoors your body but if it gets in there can be trouble.
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14 Comments:

  1. Technology Connections

    I feel like this should go without saying, but, uh, don’t go playing with that americium.
    Especially don’t eat it. That’s bad.

  2. I live in a small apartment building (15 units on three floors) and when the regs to install a common fire alarm system came in, the owners decided on a system of radio-linked photoelectric smoke, CO and heat combo sensors with a central control panel (just a single button, really – press once to wake the control unit, twice to silence all sensors that didn’t trigger, three times to completely silence the system for ten minutes) near the main entrance. Apart from the odd misstrigger by stir fry (keep the kitchen door closed!), those have worked well so far and they’ve actually caught a fire that could’ve been nasty very early on. Not a cheap option, but from what I’ve seen a very good one.

  3. I think the ionization type is just neat. Even if they are obsolete, the tech is kinda of cool.

  4. at work we use something called an Aspirating Alert Device . this is essentially the same as a smoke detection but about 100 times more sensitive . we use them with are high voltage charging systems to detect any particles in the air from an electrical arc (mainly) that its the root cause of a fire . In theory it detects the particles before anything could even have the ability to catch fire. they do work …. and trust me when that goes off the neighbourhood knows about it.

  5. Most domestic fires start as a smoldering fire. Only when combustible fuels or gases are involved, an open flame fire may occur, detectable with a ionization detector. Optical smoke detectors are in 99% of the cases OK. In industrial applications optical flame detectors are often used. They can be used in dusty environments without false alarming.

  6. Evan~Srinathji Das

    You’re one of the greatest youtubers ever!
    Thanks doing your videos! 👍❤️

  7. When you had a larger fire and got out of your house saving your life, would you prefer to deal with a pile of smoking rubble or a pile of smoking rubble with radioactive bits somewhere in it?

  8. So, there’s another type of detector but it’s not a smoke detector but rather a *FIRE* detector. It uses a form of metal with a low melting temp to set off an alarm. These are commonly used in laundry rooms, kitchens and the like. We only discovered this because many years ago we were tricked into going to a sales dinner about them but it ended up being interesting enough that we stayed to listen. The type we saw used a spring instead of a battery that way you didn’t have to change batteries. We didn’t own a home at the time so all I did was take in the info but it’s something to consider for your home as well.

  9. I’ve heard smoke alarms go off hundreds of times in my life, and every single time it’s been a nuisance alarm. I stopped calling them smoke detectors and started calling them burnt toast detectors. It’s to the point I now always assume a smoke alarm is just a nuisance alarm and don’t take it seriously. If I ever own my own home, I want photoelectric electric alarms.

  10. This video is downright dangerous and the comment section is even worse. UL 217 8th edition outlines how you want to actually use each type of sensor, and there’s smoke detectors now on the market that use both sensors with their response tuned for certain room types – kitchens, halls, bedrooms, etc. Please do a follow-up with some additional research if you could.

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